London Towne House

360 W 22nd St, New York, NY 10011

16 Floors

217 Units

Built in 1965

London Towne House is a large, white brick co-op building with fan coils in NYC with trees in front of it.

$34,610

Year 1 Actual Savings

40 Tons

Annual Reduced CO2 Emissions

How Parity Helped London Towne House

London Towne House at 360 W 22nd St is a co-op in NYC with a 2-pipe fan coil HVAC system.

Parity presented a lunch and learn at Halstead Management where Gerald Riveria, the property manager at 360 W 22nd St, was present. Gerald saw potential with Parity’s services and shared our info to Richard, an advisor to the board at 360 W 22nd St who also lives onsite.

Gerald and Richard were interested in making 360 W 22nd St a greener building. Their interest and support from a very progressive board led them to explore different pathways, including solar panels on the roof, electrification projects, working with the NYC Accelerator, and of course, Parity.

“Until this year, systems in the building ran at 100% all of the time,” says Richard Cariello, a resident on the building’s energy committee. Now, heating and cooling can be adjusted depending on factors like external temperature and demand within the building.

As part of the project scope, we oversaw the installation of high-efficiency motors for the building’s 26 exhaust fans and variable frequency drives (VFDs) for the pumps.

Motors in a two-pipe hydronic system are responsible for driving pumps to circulate water for heating and cooling. High-efficiency motors feature variable speed control. “If you scale back the speed of a motor it saves energy when it doesn’t have to run at full speed all the time,” says Corey Harris, a technical engineer with Parity.

VFDs allow for the frequency of equipment to be adjusted. For example, the building’s cooling-tower fan spins to produce adequate condenser water for the chiller in summer and the new VFD allows the fan to be operated at a lower frequency. “Instead of running it at 60 hertz to reach the set point for the condenser water, it’s possible to run it at half speed for longer and generate savings,” Harris explains.

This means motor speed and water temperature are constantly being tweaked based on data retrieved from the building. “We are looking at the energy load with respect to the weather conditions and things going on in the building to make an analysis of when you can reduce the load,” Harris says. So instead of sending 150-degree water to circulate at all times, the temperature can be lowered when demand slows.

Spring and fall are when the building reaps the most savings. “After the changeover to heating, Parity can ratchet down the heat when it’s still relatively warm, and after the switch over to cooling, Parity can do the same when it’s still relatively cool,” Cariello says. Automating the process helps alleviate the workload for building staff.

As for the return on investment, handsome incentives made adopting the technology a no-brainer, according to Cariello. “We are getting a payback in the second year,” Cariello says.

Thanks to the tech upgrades, which were financed from the co-op’s reserve fund, the building at 360 West 22nd Street is currently projected to meet Local Law 97 emission requirements until 2035, with a large part due to Parity’s work.

This Project's Impact

$34,610

Year 1 Actual Savings

40 Tons

Annual Reduced CO2 Emissions

$10,542

Potential Reduced Exposure to LL97 Fines

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